Archive for June, 2010



I went to an oil spill Q &A last night with local officials and I was chosen to ask three questions. My questions are in bold and the answers are below.  Feel free to post a comment!

1. Has there been talks about putting oxygen down into the sea floor to help the animals and/or to break up the oil faster via the algae growth?

Answer: NO. It was apparent to me that they are not concerned with the oxygen level (poor, innocent, animals!) as they are more with the lack of nitrogen and phosphorus.

Another problem with the oxygen, is that they are not sure how they could get oxygen down at that depth and a lot of the oil would already be on the sea floor. To me, it’s an obvious answer~ set up a pipe that is suspended mid sea and anchored into the sea floor with oxygen being released from the top AND at the bottom. When I offered that solution, that is when I was told that they were not so much worried about the oxygen than the lack of nitrogen and phosphorus. ūüė¶

2. Does the Corexit dispersant have a smell to it? If not, how are they testing the seafood – since it appears that they are only sniffing the fish and looking for oil? (Dispersant is toxic as well).

Answer: The dispersant normally does not have a scent. There have been no real ways to test for the toxicity of the seafood in relation to the dispersant. (This is VERY concerning to me).

3. With the dispersant being biodegradable, is toxic rain a concern?

Answer. (Long pause). No. (No real further clarification, from my standpoint).

***I have to be honest when I state that I believe that toxic rain IS a very real possibility and will be continuing to look into it further.

If YOU have any questions regarding the oil spill, clean up efforts, wild life rescue, hurricane influenced actions and/or anything else, please send me a comment here and Ill do my best to answer it or find an answer to it.


Oil Plume’s Movement as of 06.29.2010

According to the NOAA oil plume model, winds and currents will prevent further eastward movement of the oil plume along the northwestern Florida coastline. However, areas of Choctawhatchee Bay, FL will continue to receive impact as the oil plume moves slightly northwest and closer the shoreline.

At this point, the wave conditions and current have changed the oil direction and has turned it back towards the areas of the Mississippi Sound and areas around Chandeleur Island, LA and Breton Sound, LA.  The CoastGuard has stated their concern with this change of movement since these areas have been severely impacted and stated that they would send additional reserves to that area.

Tropical Storm Alex and its impact on the Gulf’s oil spill

Another hot topic is that of Tropical Storm Alex. According to NOAA.gov,  Tropical Storm Alex presently has maximum sustained winds of 70 mph, but is predicted to strengthen to a hurricane today. The track is on a NW quadrant; however, a gradual turn towards the West-NorthWest is expected.

Tropical Storm Alex is NOT interfering and is NOT expected to interfere with the current capturing/production of the oil spill in the Gulf.  The only impact that the Tropical Storm will have on the operations will be a potential delay of the any preparations  of the Helix Producer which will be the third production vessel in which was planned and coordinated as such to help reach the capacity of 53,000 barrels of oil collected by the end of the month of June.

As of now…

Approximately 188 miles of Gulf Coast shoreline is currently oiled‚ÄĒapproximately 34 miles in Louisiana, 45 miles in Mississippi, 48 miles in Alabama, and 61 miles in Florida. These numbers do not include cumulative impacts to date, or shoreline that has already been cleared.

Copyright © 2010 ClearWater Perspective.  All rights reserved.


06.18.2010

Living off the coast of Florida my entire life, I am well aware of the impact of hurricane season which officially started on June 1st. Many fears run rampant along the Gulf Coast of how a hurricane or even a tropical storm could adversely affect our shorelines by bringing more oil than assumed further inland.

The Coast Guard has appeared to taken a proactive stance in the preparation for hurricane season as I prompted them about the severity of this situation backed in late April in a previous teleconference.

Coast Guard Admiral Thaad Allen stated that the current production system can siphon up to 53,000 barrels a day by the end of June, if everything goes according to plan. Once this maximum recovery has been reached, consideration for  installing a floating riser package will be placed on the table.  The floating riser package will consist of a section of riser pipe 4000 ft long which will be anchored with buoys on top that will allow flexibility to disconnect and reconnect if a hurricane is threatening the recovery process.

Additionally, the final determination on July 1st- of replacing the containment cap by unbolting the the final section of riser pipe that was sheer cut and replacing it with a multi sitting device that is permanently bolted and sealed so that the oil can be  siphoned to production tankers above water. If this effort is successful, it is estimated to capture approximately 60,000- 80,000 barrels per day of the leaked oil which is a far jump from the current 25,000 barrels of oil a day being collected.

However, if this process is completed- it will leave the well vulnerable for an indefinite amount of time and, of course, this recovery effort has not been done within a depth of 5,000 ft- so there are many factors that need to be taken into consideration because this process could actually damper our recovery efforts.

However, it is important to note that even if this process is successful- it will not capture all of the oil, leaving a percentage of oil to continue to leak into the Gulf.

The only REAL recovery effort is the drilling of the two relief wells. The current depth of the first well drilling is 10,677 ft below the sea floor and the second well drilling has drilled as far down as 4,662 ft below the sea floor. As the current operation stands, the angled relief wells which will intersect the gushing well to relieve the pressure will not be ready until mid August– which is approximately 2 months away.

Between the current recovery efforts, hurricane season upon us and oil puddles lapping onto the shores as far East as Okaloosa County, FL— the hopes of the Gulf Coast residents are diminishing exponentially to practically nonexistent. The only thing that can save the Gulf residents is strong local leadership, a loud voice and a determined humanitarian spirit.

Copyright © 2010 ClearWater Perspective.  All rights reserved.


As the tar bars wash upon the shores of Santa Rosa County, FL and oil sheen looms in the distance- the realization of the effects of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill are apparently obvious. Florida is now under attack from the greed of big oil.

Deep Water Horizon, an exploratory well, exploded on April 20, 2010 when the drilling rig encountered a methane gas bubble and combined with fresh cementing and a lack of mud as a natural barrier- gas barreled up the pipe and exploded leaving 11 people missing.

Without fire boom on board or any safety measures indiciated at a well depth of 5000 ft; this left little to no options on how to stop the oil flow at its source, allowing anywhere from 12,000-25,000 (with higher numbers almost certain to be announced in the future) barrels of oil per day leaking into the Gulf of Mexico.

After several unsuccessful or weak attempts from BP with the top hat, the riser insertion tool, the top kill- BP has put forth another option: yet another cap in attempt to divert the oil flow onto a ship for collection.

As of date, 462,000 gallons of oil has been collected with the ability for the amount to increase as the additional vents are closed.

In a concerning fashion, BP is warning that the amount of oil could *increase* another 20% until all of the valves are closed. At that point, BP is estimating that this tool could capture up to 80% of the flow rate.

The main concern is keeping the pressure down so that it doesnt blow the imperfect seal and keeping the water out so that the gas hydrates do not form as it did with the large containment chamber.

However, even if the containment chamber is effective- it still will leave approximately 20% of the oil to leak into the Gulf of Mexico until the two relief wells are operational which would take until mid to late August as the current deadline stands.

If this attempt fails, BP says its previously failed techniques might still come in handy. A revamped version of its “top kill” procedure, which previously failed to inject mud into the leaking pipe and stop it up.

BP says within a couple weeks, it hopes it can actually use that failed hardware, which is still attached, to try to suck oil out instead. There are also more giant steel “top-hat” domes standing by.¬† However, the relief wells are the best bet to divert the flow of oil and those will not be completed until August.

Copyright © 2010 ClearWater Perspective.  All rights reserved.


I apologize for the break in updates on the oil spill as we have been preparing for the oil to hit our shorelines.

As of yesterday, June 4th- I am sad to announce that tar bars and some tar mats have came on shore in Escambia County and have traveled as far East to Navarre Beach, FL.

In the upcoming days, I will be collaborating all of my accumulated data and working on putting forth an overview of the last few days. Please stay tuned to this blog for more information.

Thank you for caring during this time of tragedy.